The Hands That Feed You

At the Intersection of Food and Culture:

Chef Cevie Touré and our Black History Month Menu

Cevie Touré

Cevie Touré in the Three Stone Hearth kitchen

This is the first year that Three Stone Hearth has offered a menu dedicated to the foods of the African Diaspora. In developing the menu, we worked closely with Cevie Touré, a newer member of our TSH Kitchen Production team who brings a wealth of experience to this work. She created the recipe for the Ghanaian Chicken Stew that we’re offering, and consulted on the menu at many levels. Here, Cevie tells her story.

My father is from Mali, in West Africa, and my mom’s side of the family is African American with roots in St. Louis, Illinois and Indiana. I have a large family, so there is a lot of gathering and cooking — when I visit we feast! Growing up, my grandma had an extensive garden out of necessity, and fresh, homegrown food was a way of life. My cousins and I grew up foraging for fruit all around the neighborhood.
I was an athlete for many years, and in my mid-twenties I struggled with my health and sought out Chinese medicine and moved toward a more holistic path. I discovered the work of Weston Price and Sally Fallon, which had a big impact on me, and I became very interested in my ancestral foods.
I was also a dancer, specializing in African, Brazilian and Haitian dance, and this really led me to fall in love with the foods of the African Diaspora. When we had Brazilian dance events we would eat feijoada (meat and bean stew) and farofa (toasted manioc flour). I assisted in the kitchen and got to  enjoy couve a mineira (garlicky collard greens), cozinha (breaded and fried chicken salad), pão de queijo (gluten-free cheese puffs) and so many other foods through my work in Brazilian dance. Brazil is the only country I’ve been to where I feel my palate would never get tired — the food is just so amazing. And it was spending time at Haitian dance events that I learned about pikliz, the spicy pickled cabbage Haitians always have on hand. At Three Stone this week, I worked with Andy  Renard in Fermentation to offer pikliz on this menu.
Through my father’s side of the family I’ve been able to spend time in Bamako, Mali. Eating the traditional foods there, I discovered that I felt healthier and very strong. My digestion improved. Small but chronic health issues healed up. I think my body really resonates with those foods. I remember eating lots of beets, mangos, soups and stews, rice, fresh fish, and the most nourishing eggs I’ve ever eaten.
The first time I ate the Ghanaian Chicken Stew that we’re offering this week was actually at an African dance camp in Hawaii. I remember  the exact taste on my palate  — it was a version with beef that the African dance teachers cooked for us, and it resonated deeply in my body. I started practicing making it myself, trying to recreate that experience. When I went to Mali and Senegal I realized that versions of that stew are cooked throughout West Africa and made with many different kinds of meat — goat, beef, chicken, guinea fowl. The consistent parts are onions, tomatoes, carrots, cabbage, and some habanero peppers. Sometimes it uses potato, often thyme.
The version I developed for Three Stone Hearth is less spicy than what I first ate but still quite authentic. The big pieces of carrot are crucial, and I recommend eating it over rice — in Africa you would cut off a piece of carrot and a bit of meat and eat a mouthful with rice. You could eat it over the Reezy, too.
When I went back to school to finish my degree in International Relations, I decided to focus on the question of how food can restore cultural identity. I wrote about Hawaii, and the relationship between the traditional foods and cultural restoration. Even though my  personal journey has had to do with the traditional diets of the African Diaspora, the connections to many techniques and foods in the traditional Hawaiian diet are closely related to Africa The influence of African foods on the cuisine of the world is overlooked  and undervalued.

Menu for Week of 2/8/17

Our New Menu
Celebrating Valentine’s Day,
For order pickups, deliveries and store shopping
beginning Wednesday, February 8th 
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What says "I love you" better than saffron and rose petals? Our Persian Beef Stew with Butternut Squash features grassfed beef from Bill Niman's BN Ranch, Riverdog Farm butternut squash and our own Grassfed Beef Broth -- yes, and carefully sourced saffron threads and dried rose petals!

What says “I love you” better than saffron and rose petals? Our Persian Beef Stew with Butternut Squash features grassfed beef from Bill Niman’s BN Ranch, Riverdog Farm butternut squash and our own Grassfed Beef Broth — yes, and carefully sourced saffron threads and dried rose petals!

Chicken Vegetable Soup*
Persian Beef Stew with Butternut Squash*
Sunny Cream of Tomato Soup*
Ground Beef Stroganoff
Cottage Pie with Cauliflower Mash*
Confit of Gizzards and Hearts*
Enchilada Sauce*
Creamy Polenta with Spinach and Cheddar
Pickled Beets*
Winter Season Salad with Quinoa, Feta and Delicata Squash
Green Goddess Dressing
Truffled Mushrooms Duxelles*
Chocolate Olive Oil Cake
Orange-Hazelnut Chocolate Frosting
French Vanilla Chia Pudding
Transit Bars*
Maybe one thing that does say "I love you" more than saffron and rose petals is chocolate and cherries. Clink your glasses with a probiotic splash of our special Cherry Cacao Kefir!

Maybe one thing that does say “I love you” more than saffron and rose petals is chocolate and cherries. Clink your glasses with a probiotic splash of our special Cherry Cacao Kefir!

Plain Granola
TSH Oatmeal
Housemade Ketchup*
TSH Mayonnaise
Yogurt Cream
Golden Blend*
plus Our Slow-Cooked Bone Broths*
Chicken, Beef and Pork
*GAPS Diet-Friendly Dishes

New Website & Ordering System

Three Stone Hearth Launching our New Website and Online Ordering System

planned for Friday, February 10th

We may sound like “The Boy Who Cried Website,” but this time it’s true!
new website homepage
After ten years of dedicated service, our custom-designed online ordering system will be retired, and a new website and ordering platform will carry the torch forward. The new site will integrate all our product and customer account information with the content of our website — information about our foods and our business, FAQ, a new blog and portraits of our worker-owners, staff, farmers and news sections.
The new site will be more attractive, user-friendly and mobile responsive. It will be easier to see what we offer and find what you want. There will be product categories and tags, so you can search for things like “gluten-free,” “paleo,” “local,” and much more.  We will have a lot more information across the board, that will allow you to plug into the local food system, keep up to date with nutritional news and connect with us through social media.
Our goal is for a seamless transition that shouldn’t inconvenience customers at all.
Highlights — What You Need to Know:
  • You will receive an email newsletter like this one when the website is active — hopefully Friday evening, February 10th (one day later than our usual Thursday evening announcement).
  • If you already have an account with us, log in as a “Returning Customer” — your account information and history will be there for you to see.
  • The first time you place an order in our new system, you will have to enter a credit card number.