Farewell Broth Fat Cap

For many years, we have put a layer of fat (a “fat cap”) on top of our bone broths. Starting next week with our Spring 7 menu, we’re planning to discontinue this process on all our broths (chicken, beef and pork) for several reasons:
1. It’s unnecessary. The original idea behind the fat layer was to create a seal to help preserve the broth underneath. But our broths are extremely well preserved by our jarring process. We jar the broth very hot and cool it quickly in an ice bath, which creates suction on the lid. As a result, the broths last a long time in refrigeration as long as the seal on the lid isn’t broken. We have tested the refrigerated shelf life of our broths with and without the fat cap, and it lasts just as long either way.
2. Customers will get an additional 1-2 ounces of broth in their jars because we will have room under the freezer-safe line if there’s no fat cap.
cropped version3. Adding the fat to each jar is labor intensive, and causes repetitive stress on the wrists of those doing the work (we produce 700-1000 jars of broth each week).
4. Many customers don’t want it — some don’t want the fat in their broth, and find it hard to use in other ways. We offer chicken fat for sale as schmaltz, and pork fat for sale as lard. We will also begin to offer beef fat for sale as tallow for a great price, and this traditional fat can either be added to your hot broth, and generally used for sautéeing or frying.

Menu For The Week Of 4/27/16

Our New Menu Is Up!

Place Your Order Now

Spring 8 Menu 

  • Peanut Curry with Chicken & Mixed Vegetables*
  • Beef Soup with Seasonal Vegetables*
  • Ragu Bolognese*

    Creamy Nettle Puree is loaded with the tender leaves of baby stinging nettles. Harmless when cooked down, nettles can be foraged throughout Bay Area open spaces, but wear gloves when you pick and prepare them!

    Creamy Nettle Puree is loaded with the tender leaves of baby stinging nettles. Harmless when cooked down, nettles can be foraged throughout Bay Area open spaces, but wear gloves when you pick and prepare them!

  • Creamy Nettle Puree*
  • Cottage Pie (Shepherd’s Pie with Ground Beef)
  • Chicken Liver Pate
  • Escarole in Tomato Brodo with Parmesan*
  • Cauliflower Hummus*
  • Cardoon Tapenade with Capers and Garlic*
  • Herb Vinaigrette with Lovage*
  • Thai Style Infused Broth (Tom Kha)*
  • Ginger Spice Cake
  • Coconut Chocolate Pudding
*GAPS Diet-friendly Recipes
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Slow Food East Bay Event

Sunday, April 24, 5pm- 8pm

A Benefit for Slow Food East Bay!

Fish Preservation: 

Pickling and Fermenting

with Kirk Lombard of Sea Forager,
Willow Blish of Slow Food and
TSH’s Andrew Renard, “The French Pickler”
Join Slow Food East Bay at Three Stone Hearth for the second hands-on workshop on fish preservation.
Who doesn’t love some good pickled fish? Have you ever tried surf smelt? Here’s your chance to learn about fish seasonality and explore pickling lesser-known species. Increase the “funk” by trying your hand at ojingeojeot (a Korean salted and fermented squid) plus Thai fish sauce!

This benefit event is to help Slow Food East Bay cover the cost of sending three local fisherpeople to the

Slow Fish Conference
in New Orleans last month.
Cost is $50.
Please email slowfoodeastbay@gmail.com to reserve a spot or for more information.
The workshop will  take place at Three Stone  Hearth, 1581 University Ave.
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