Welcome!

Three Stone Hearth is pioneering a new business model: a community-supported, worker-owned cooperative, and a teaching kitchen all in one.

Our Mission: We heal our community, our planet, and ourselves by building a sustainable model for community scale food preparation and processing that honors culinary traditions and provides nutrient dense foods for local households and beyond.

Our work is grounded in shared values of sustainability, community, and health.
Inspired by diverse cuisines, our weekly menus are prepared using the nourishing traditions approach to ensure maximum digestibility and nutrient absorption. Ordering from us helps reduce your carbon footprint.  We pack our foods in re-usable glass containers, compost waste, and purchase from local farms.

Our ingredients include:

  • organically farmed produce, grains, and nuts
  • pasture-raised meats, eggs, and dairy products
  • unrefined sweeteners
  • traditional fats

Menu for the Week of 2/22

Our New Menu
For order pickups, deliveries and store shopping
beginning Wednesday, February 22nd
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Inside this simple bowl is a revelation! Our Velvet Underground Soup offers a nightshade-free and dairy-free alternative to creamy tomato soup that will satisfy body and soul.

Inside this simple bowl is a revelation! Our Velvet Underground Soup offers a nightshade-free and dairy-free alternative to creamy tomato soup that will satisfy body and soul.

Chicken and Rice with Brazilian Coconut Sauce

Hearty Beef Soup with Seasonal Vegetables*
Velvet Underground Soup (Nightshade Free “Tomato Soup”)*
Thai Style Ground Pork*
Thai Infused Broth (Tom Kha)*
Baked Polenta with Leeks, Greens and Cheddar
Mushroom and Walnut Pâté*
Red Beans and Rice
Marinara Sauce*
Sea Vegetable Salad with Carrots, Daikon and Burdock
Kale Caesar Salad in a Jar*
Green Olive Tapenade*
Herb Vinaigrette*

Rosehips are steeped in rose geranium-infused water, then blended with raw local honey for this delicate and nutrient-packed spread.

Rosehips are steeped in rose geranium-infused water, then blended with raw local honey for this delicate and nutrient-packed spread.

Rosehip Honey Spread*
Coconut Chocolate Fudge
Maple-Vanilla Tapioca Pudding
Transit Bars*, Paleo Crunch*, Granola with Blueberries and Toasted Coconut, TSH Oatmeal
Housemade Cultured Ketchup*, TSH Mayonnaise, Piima Cream
plus Our Slow-Cooked Bone Broths*
Chicken, Beef and Pork
*GAPS Diet-Friendly Dishes

Menu for Week of 2/15/17

Celebrating Black History Month: 

Foods of the African Diaspora

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For order pickups, deliveries and store shopping
beginning Wednesday, February 15th
Callaloo! Tastes as wonderful as it sounds. A favorite throughout the Caribbean that often uses taro and amaranth leaves, our local winter version of this soup features collard greens from Feral Heart Farm in Sunol, and spinach and chard from County Line Harvest in Sonoma.

Callaloo! Tastes as wonderful as it sounds. A favorite throughout the Caribbean that often uses taro and amaranth leaves, our local winter version of this soup features collard greens from Feral Heart Farm in Sunol, and spinach and chard from County Line Harvest in Sonoma.

Ghanaian Chicken Stew*
Lentil Chili with Lamb*
Callaloo Soup*
Ethiopian Beef Stew (Sega Wat)*
Dominican Beef and Plantain Casserole
Chicken Liver Pâté
Carolina Gold Rice Grits (Reezy)
Sea Island Red Peas (Peezy)
West African Fritter Dough (Akara)
Pikliz*
Kale Caesar Salad in a Jar*
Honey Mustard Dressing*
Aster’s Eritrean Pesto*
Paleo Date Walnut Cake*
Hibiscus Gelatina with Coconut Cream*
Transit Bars*
A classic combination from the Gullah tradition of the Carolina coast and Georgia Sea Islands, Reezy and Peezy feature buttered rice grits and a rich stew of Sea Island Red Peas.

A classic combination from the Gullah tradition of the Carolina coast and Georgia Sea Islands, Reezy and Peezy feature buttered rice grits and a rich stew of Sea Island Red Peas.

Granola with Almonds & Raisins
TSH Oatmeal
Housemade Cultured Ketchup*
TSH Mayonnaise
Yogurt Cream
plus Our Slow-Cooked Bone Broths*
Chicken, Beef and Pork
*GAPS Diet-Friendly Dishes

 

The Hands That Feed You

At the Intersection of Food and Culture:

Chef Cevie Touré and our Black History Month Menu

Cevie Touré

Cevie Touré in the Three Stone Hearth kitchen

This is the first year that Three Stone Hearth has offered a menu dedicated to the foods of the African Diaspora. In developing the menu, we worked closely with Cevie Touré, a newer member of our TSH Kitchen Production team who brings a wealth of experience to this work. She created the recipe for the Ghanaian Chicken Stew that we’re offering, and consulted on the menu at many levels. Here, Cevie tells her story.

My father is from Mali, in West Africa, and my mom’s side of the family is African American with roots in St. Louis, Illinois and Indiana. I have a large family, so there is a lot of gathering and cooking — when I visit we feast! Growing up, my grandma had an extensive garden out of necessity, and fresh, homegrown food was a way of life. My cousins and I grew up foraging for fruit all around the neighborhood.
I was an athlete for many years, and in my mid-twenties I struggled with my health and sought out Chinese medicine and moved toward a more holistic path. I discovered the work of Weston Price and Sally Fallon, which had a big impact on me, and I became very interested in my ancestral foods.
I was also a dancer, specializing in African, Brazilian and Haitian dance, and this really led me to fall in love with the foods of the African Diaspora. When we had Brazilian dance events we would eat feijoada (meat and bean stew) and farofa (toasted manioc flour). I assisted in the kitchen and got to  enjoy couve a mineira (garlicky collard greens), cozinha (breaded and fried chicken salad), pão de queijo (gluten-free cheese puffs) and so many other foods through my work in Brazilian dance. Brazil is the only country I’ve been to where I feel my palate would never get tired — the food is just so amazing. And it was spending time at Haitian dance events that I learned about pikliz, the spicy pickled cabbage Haitians always have on hand. At Three Stone this week, I worked with Andy  Renard in Fermentation to offer pikliz on this menu.
Through my father’s side of the family I’ve been able to spend time in Bamako, Mali. Eating the traditional foods there, I discovered that I felt healthier and very strong. My digestion improved. Small but chronic health issues healed up. I think my body really resonates with those foods. I remember eating lots of beets, mangos, soups and stews, rice, fresh fish, and the most nourishing eggs I’ve ever eaten.
The first time I ate the Ghanaian Chicken Stew that we’re offering this week was actually at an African dance camp in Hawaii. I remember  the exact taste on my palate  — it was a version with beef that the African dance teachers cooked for us, and it resonated deeply in my body. I started practicing making it myself, trying to recreate that experience. When I went to Mali and Senegal I realized that versions of that stew are cooked throughout West Africa and made with many different kinds of meat — goat, beef, chicken, guinea fowl. The consistent parts are onions, tomatoes, carrots, cabbage, and some habanero peppers. Sometimes it uses potato, often thyme.
The version I developed for Three Stone Hearth is less spicy than what I first ate but still quite authentic. The big pieces of carrot are crucial, and I recommend eating it over rice — in Africa you would cut off a piece of carrot and a bit of meat and eat a mouthful with rice. You could eat it over the Reezy, too.
When I went back to school to finish my degree in International Relations, I decided to focus on the question of how food can restore cultural identity. I wrote about Hawaii, and the relationship between the traditional foods and cultural restoration. Even though my  personal journey has had to do with the traditional diets of the African Diaspora, the connections to many techniques and foods in the traditional Hawaiian diet are closely related to Africa The influence of African foods on the cuisine of the world is overlooked  and undervalued.